Keynote address at the Open Institute V2, December 15-20, Madeira

funchalI am very excited to be presenting one of the keynote addresses at this year’s Open Institute V2 in Funchal, Madeira island’s capital, Portugal. I will be speaking on the limits to mobilization. More on the event theme below.

Open in a Time of Closure

Many of the ideals around ‘open’ in the last two decades are facing dramatic retrogression. The open Internet is under threat, already lost in much of the world. Borders are closing in the West; negative impacts of the closed scientific/academic publication system are becoming clearer; public speech and transparency are suffering throughout the world. Meanwhile, states are imprisoning principled practitioners of agonistic openness like Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning, and Texas native Reality Winner with a vigor not shown since the enlightenment.

How do the last few years challenge or reinforce the need for openness? Can principles of openness developed in prior decades survive closure? Are new techniques necessary?

Open Institute V2, “Open in a Time of Closure,” seeks to explore these themes with an emphasis on extreme or agonistic approaches to free/open practices.

New Publication: Literal Media Ecology: Crisis in the Conditions of Production

I have a new article in Television & New Media.

Abstract

This article outlines a socio-political theory appropriate for the study of the ecological repercussions of contemporary media technologies. More specifically, this approach provides a means of assessing the material impacts of media technologies and the representations of capitalist ecological crises. This approach builds on the work of ecological economists, ecosocialist scholars, and Marx’s writings on the conditions of production to argue that capitalism necessarily results in ecological destabilization. Taking Apple’s 2016 Environmental Responsibility Report as a case study, the article uses the theory to analyze Apple’s responses to ecological crises. The article asserts that Apple’s reactions are emblematic of the capitalist compulsion for increasing rates of productivity. However, unless the matter/energy savings achieved through higher rates of productivity surpass the overall increase in the flow of matter/energy in production, ecological crises will continue. Ultimately, capital accumulation ensures continued ecological destabilization.

Read more HERE